Intel Road Map

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This is a guide to the Intel road map as it stands in early 2010.

Contents

Basics

There are two components to the motherboard, the CPU and the Motherboard Chipset. The CPUs will only work in certain chipsets but there is overlap between them. Also, the chipset is based on the microarchitecture. The current microarchitecture (for the last few years) has been "Core" (Core 2) microarchitecture. Nehalem (Core i7) is the next generation microarchitecture, and Sandy Bridge is the microarchitecture successor to Nehalem.

Note: Nehalem is an exception in the naming scheme in that it refers to both a processor (Clarksfield, Auburnsdale), a chipset (Calpella), and a microarchitecture (Nehalem). Most people refer to it's chipset properties though when mentioning it.

Second Note: To be extremely accurate, what are usually called chipsets are actually platforms - ie. Santa Rosa platform, Montevina platform, Calpella platform, etc. A platform has three components - the CPU, the motherboard chipset, and the wireless network interface. But for layman's usage of these terms most people use the motherboard chipset name (Cantiga) as the platform name (Montevina), which while not technically correct is the way it is used on these forums so the same thing has been done here. The confusion arises when discussing future platforms (of which there may be one large one - notably Calpella, which is based on Nehalem processors), but which may have multiple motherboard chipsets (currently unknown names of future chipsets but there are likely others coming in the future).

Intel's roadmap alternates between die shrinks and new microarchitectures, one of which happens roughly every year. This is called "tick-tock," and each "tick" is a die shrink and each "tock" is a new microarchitecture.

Intel's Road Map for Next Few Years
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Intel's Road Map for Next Few Years
Nehalem, Westmere Road Map
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Nehalem, Westmere Road Map
The Montevina and Santa Rosa Features
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The Montevina and Santa Rosa Features
Nehalem Features
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Nehalem Features
More Nehalem Features
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More Nehalem Features

Nehalem (45 nm)

Nehalem is a new microarchitecture that includes features such as better performance, better power efficiency, simultaneous multithreading, an integrated memory controller, and QuickPath. QuickPath is not available in the mobile variants.

* Note that mobile Nehalem microarchitecture CPU TDPs are 8-10 W higher than Penryn CPU TDPs with equivalent heat. For Clarksfield, this is due to the integrated northbridge, and for Arrandale, this is due to the integrated GPU. However, Clarksfield has shown to be quite hot.

Lynnfield (September 2009, January 2010)

Lynnfield is the mainstream desktop variant of Nehalem. The regular 95 W TDP variants were released in September, while the S 82 W TDP variants were released in January. It may end up in the iMac (some variants already are).

Core i7 (4C/8T): 870 (2.93 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, 95 W, $562), 860 (2.8 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, 95 W, $284), 860S (2.53 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, 82 W, $337)

Core i5 (4C/4T): 750 (2.67 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, 95 W, $196), 750S (2.4 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, 82 W, $259)

Clarksfield (September 2009)

Clarksfield replaces the Penryn quad-cores. It may end up in the MacBook Pro.

Core i7 Extreme (55 W): 920XM (2.0 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, $1054)

Core i7 (45 W): 820QM (1.73 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 8 MB L3, $546), 720QM (1.6 GHz, 2x DDR3-1333, 6 MB L3, $364)

Westmere (32 nm)

Westmere is the 32 nm shrink of the Nehalem microarchitecture, with other improvements.

Clarkdale (January 2010)

Arrandale is dual-core, and replaces the desktop Penryn dual-cores. It may end up in the iMac.

Core i5 (2C/4T): 670 (3.47 GHz, 733 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1333, 4 MB L3, 73 W, $284), 661 (3.33 GHz, 900 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1333, 4 MB L3, 87 W, $196), 660 (3.33 GHz, 733 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1333, 4 MB L3, 73 W, $196), 650 (3.2 GHz, 733 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1333, 4 MB L3, 73 W, $176)

Core i3 (2C/4T): 540 (3.07 GHz, 733 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1333, 4 MB L3, 73 W, $133), 530 (2.93 GHz, 733 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1333, 4 MB L3, 73 W, $113)

Arrandale (January 2010)

Arrandale is dual-core, and replaces the mobile Penryn dual-cores. It may end up in the Mac mini, MacBook, and MacBook Pro.

Core i7 (2C/4T, 35 W): 620M (2.67 GHz, 767 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 4 MB L3, $332)

Core i5 (2C/4T, 35 W): 540M (2.53 GHz, 767 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 3 MB L3, $257), 520M (2.4 GHz, 767 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 3 MB L3, $225), 430M (2.27 GHz, 767 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 3 MB L3, OEM)

Core i3 (2C/4T, 35 W): 350M (2.27 GHz, 667 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 3 MB L3, OEM), 330M (2.13 GHz, 667 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 3 MB L3, OEM)

Core i7 (2C/4T, 25 W Low Voltage): 640LM (2.13 GHz, 567 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 4 MB L3, $332), 620LM (2.0 GHz, 567 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-1067, 4 MB L3, $300)

Core i7 (2C/4T, 18 W Ultra Low Voltage): 640UM (1.2 GHz, 500 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-800, 4 MB L3, $305), 620UM (1.07 GHz, 500 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-800, 4 MB L3, $278)

Core i5 (2C/4T, 18 W Ultra Low Voltage): 520UM (1.07 GHz, 500 MHz GPU, 2x DDR3-800, 3 MB L3, $241)

Westmere-EP (March 2010)

Westmere EP has 4 and 6 cores and succeeds Gainestown on the workstation/server segment.

Xeon (6C/12T): X5680 (3.33 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 6.4 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 130 W, $1663), X5670 (2.93 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 6.4 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 95 W, $1440), X5660 (2.8 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 6.4 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 95 W, $1219), X5650 (2.67 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 6.4 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 95 W, $996), E5645 (2.4 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 95 W, $958), L5640 (2.27 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 60 W, $996), L5638 (2.0 GHz, 3x DDR3-1333, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 60 W, $958)

Xeon (4C/8T): X5677 (3.47 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 6.4 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 130 W, $1663), X5667 (3.07 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 6.4 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 95 W, $1440), E5640 (2.67 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 80 W, $774), E5630 (2.53 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 80 W, $551), E5620 (2.4 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 80 W, $387), L5630 (2.13 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 40 W, $551), L5618 (1.87 GHz, 3x DDR3-1067, 2x QPI 5.87 GT/s, 12 MB L3, 40 W, $530)

Sandy Bridge (32 nm)

Sandy Bridge is the microarchitecture to succeed Nehalem. Sandy Bridge was revealed during CES 2011 and was officially released in February 2011. The new line of Sandy Bridge processors was present in the Early 2011 MacBook Pro refresh.

Overview of variants

Sandy Bridge-EP succeeds Westmere-EP

Sandy Bridge B2 is the high-end desktop variant. The 8-core variant (20 MB L3) succeeds Bloomfield and the 6-core variant (15 MB L3) succeeds high-end Lynnfield.

Sandy Bridge H2 is the mainstream and low-end desktop variant as well as the mobile variant. These variants have an on-die integrated GPU. For the desktop variants, the 4-core variant (65-95 W, 6 MB L3) succeeds low-end Lynnfield and high-end Clarkdale and the 2-core variant (65 W, 3 MB L3) succeeds Clarkdale. The GPU in Sandy Bridge is reported to have 2x the performance of the one in Clarkdale/Arrandale.

There is also a version of 2-core Sandy Bridge H2 with 2 integrated GPUs.

Ivy Bridge (22 nm)

Ivy Bridge is the shrink of Sandy Bridge, and is expected to be introduced in 2012.

Haswell (22 nm)

Haswell is the microarchitecture to succeed Sandy Bridge, will have fused multiply-add (FMA), and may start with 8 cores. It is expected to be introduced in 2013. Rockwell is the shrink of Haswell, expected for 2014.

Other

Notes:

The CPUs listed here are not all the CPUs under the code names, but all the CPUs that are believed to be relevant to Apple's lineups.

Unreleased CPUs are in italics. A price drop is counted as "unreleased."

Unofficial roadmap: http://74.125.113.132/translate_c?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http://pc.watch.impress.co.jp/img/pcw/docs/302/074/html/kaigai3.jpg.html&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhiEXXX5Y-ygic8rlZ2UnxvLvqEKUg